Glossary

  • Italian:  used mainly to describe the cooking of pastas, it indicates food that has been cooked to the point of slight resistance when bitten.

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  • French:  Meat served in its own juices.

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  • Cook with a steady and dry heat.

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  • To set off the colour of flavour of quickly plunging into boiling water.  Can also be used to loosen skin, remove excess salt, or bleach.

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  • A braise generally uses cubed meat or small bone-in pieces such as lamb shanks. A braise uses very little liquid in relation to the quantity or size of the meat. The meat is barely immersed in the liquid (roughly one cup of liquid to 1kg of meat). The cooking liquid for a braise is highly concentrated and is served as a sauce or gravy. A braise, more than a stew or casserole, may need a little extra liquid when reheating. Support its flavours by using stock or wine rather than water.

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  • Cook until the meat turns to a brown colour.

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  • To cook  food in such a way that it releases its sugars and continues cooking until a golden brown, caramel colour.

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  • A casserole is similar to a stew; it calls for the same cuts and technique but is cooked in a casserole dish in the oven rather than on the cooktop.

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  • To remove any solids from a stock by cooking it over heat with egg white, lean minced meat and vegetables added to it.  Cooking should continue until egg white, meat and vegetables rise to the top, forming a crust.  This brings the solids and impurities to the top, leaving the stock crystal clear when crust is removed.

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  • To preserve or conserve.  Cooking meat in its own fat, or fruit and vegetables in their own juices and storing them in the fat or juices.

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